Upcoming Prayers:

  • 01

    DAY

  • 07

    MONTH

  • 2016

    YEAR

  • Nduberi

    VENUE

24/7 Support: +254 715494462

info@akurinucommunity.org

Upcoming Prayers:

  • 01

    DAY

  • 10

    MONTH

  • 2016

    YEAR

  • NDUBERI

    VENUE

24/7 Support: +254 715494462

info@akurinucommunity.org

Akorino religious vestments and symbols

Akorino religious vestments and symbols

Gacuka is an adornment worn by married women.

Turban - is a band of cloth wrapped around the head several times into a neat headdress. It is a sign that identifies all the Akorino people as peace makers.

Kanjũ - is a from Kiswahili word kanzu. The garment is used during church services. It reflects the Aaronic priestly garment every minister serving at the altar was supposed to wear. By wearing priestly garments, all Akorino, both male and female, affirm that they are called to pray for peace for the country.

Mondo - is a white bag hang over the shoulders of Akorino elders during service, and especially during Church ceremonies (magongona.) Inside the white bag is the Akorino’s religious literature. The sanctity of the contents of the bag warrants its handling with honor and reverence. Therein are documents of the doctrine and practice of the Akorino as a community of faith and worship.

Gaaru - according to Waigwa (2007), the idea of a gaarũ is traditionally Ameru in origin, where young warriors lived together in large buildings called gaarũ. There, they underwent rigorous training on military methods and social responsibility. The gaarũ itself was an extended hut where warriors ate their meals and slept. Within the gaarũ was a kitchen space and storage facilities for the belongings of the young men. The Akorino adopted the gaarũ barrack as a church facility to be used for various activities. It proved to be a great innovation, especially because it allowed church members to meet in an informal manner and learn from each other. Gaarũs also became very useful in providing accommodation for travelling evangelists, pastors, and prophets who frequented the church community. There were separate gaarũ for males and females, with the gaarũ for females doubling as a kitchen as well. Informal services could be held in the gaarũ designated for males. During such meetings, females are allowed into them. To this day, it is customary for each church campus to have two gaarũs, for the separate use of each sex. During Mau Mau and the violent struggle for independence, gaarus were a refuge to many Akorino who were severely persecuted for joining the group. Others were made outcaste by their village communities.

CHOOSE YOUR COLOR:

HEADER SETTING:

STICKY
NORMAL

CHOOSE YOUR LAYOUT:

WIDE
BOXED

CHOOSE YOUR PATTERN:

* Only For Boxed Layout